Have Fun in Incheon: what to do and see in Incheon, Korea


Have Fun in Incheon: what to do and See in Incheon, Korea

 

The journey of almost all newcomers to Korea starts from the same place - Incheon International Airport, which is the largest in the country and one of the busiest in the world. Apart from this, the city of Incheon, where it is located, has a rich variety of attractions to offer to its guests, and we strongly recommend you visit. The diversity of tourist activities in Korea is remarkably abundant and Incheon is no exception to that - historical monuments, fabulous murals, multicultural neighborhoods, and amusement parks combined with scenic sea views are just some of the adventures which you can experience here. A trip to Incheon can take you to countless destinations without even catching a plane from the airport there and we will share some of them in this guide. 

 

Incheon Metropolitan City Museum

Photo: by Margarita Kichukova

 

Location: Map

Directions: 20-min walk from Songdo Station (Suin Line)/ Bus 8 or 16 

Operating Hours: 09:00 - 18:00 (closed on Mondays)

 

A lot of people might not know this, but Incheon Metropolitan City Museum opened in 1946 as the first museum available to the general public in Korea. It has changed its location several times since the first building was damaged during the Korean War. Fortunately, the exhibits survived and were displayed again in 1953 on the site of the then Jemulpo (the old name of Incheon) Club, a gathering place for foreigners residing in the port area. In the post-war years of devastation and crisis, the place played an important role as an educational center for the locals. This function continues to this day with the designation of the museum as a regional cultural institute in 1993, shortly after its relocation to its current building. The museum has a permanent exhibition dedicated to the history of the region as well as temporary exhibitions, usually related to other aspects of Korean history. The sea view from its location is breathtaking and within its premises is the Memorial Hall for Incheon Landing Operation. If you are interested in learning more about Korea, you should definitely pay a visit to this complex, in addition to the museums and galleries in Seoul.

 

Songwol-dong Fairy Tale Village

Photo: by Margarita Kichukova

 

Location: Map

Directions: 10-min walk from Incheon Station (Suin Line, Line 1)

Operating Hours: Open 24 hours (different working hours for each facility)

 

Another example of successful restoration of the cityscape is perhaps the most famous tourist attraction in Incheon - the Fairytale Village. Recently, local authorities have developed a unique strategy to transform the crumbling facades of the houses in Songwol-dong neighborhood by painting them with fairy-tale characters, thus turning the place into a magical world loved by kids and adults alike. The atmosphere on the streets suddenly takes us away from the gray everyday life with its vivid colors and decorations, which include a variety of characters, familiar to the public from Disney movies, traditional Korean fairy tales, and biblical stories. If you have not had the chance to visit the famous optical illusion museums in Hongdae and Insadong, you can visit the local one, the entrance fee of which is cheaper than its alternatives in Seoul. If you enjoy visiting fun cafes in Korea, don’t miss Cafe Oz, the facade of which is decorated with motives from Baum’s books, while the interior is inspired by… the Japanese animation “One Piece”! Immersed in this strange combination of characters, you can try their signature dessert called “drug ice cream” for its addicting taste.  The village is unforgettable for all who have ever dreamed of discovering Wonderland, flying with Tinkerbell and Peter Pan, or helping Dorothy find the Wizard of Oz.

 

Incheon Chinatown

Photo: by Margarita Kichukova

 

Location: Map

Directions: 5-10 min walk from Incheon Station (Suin Line, Line 1)

Operating Hours: Open 24 hours (different working hours for each facility)

 

Next to the Fairytale Village is Incheon’s Chinatown. Actually, the two attractions are somewhat merged, so sometimes it is difficult to determine which is which, but the panda-decorated street lamps should give you a hint! Although the large Chinese diaspora in the country can also be seen in other neighborhoods, Incheon’s Chinatown is the only one officially recognized as such. Its entrance is an impressive gate in traditional Chinese style, and the characteristic architecture of the local buildings clearly aims to emphasize the difference between China and Korea. In addition to the spectacular facilities, you can also enjoy parks and pavilions in a similar style, as well as murals depicting aspects of Chinese culture such as calligraphy and Beijing opera masks. The most popular attraction here is definitely the food, which is evident from the local restaurants that seemingly take us beyond the Great Wall of China not only with the authentic taste of their dishes, but also with their sumptuous interior. Not only the restaurants, but also many street food pavilions have appeared on reality shows and other television programs and you should not be surprised by the huge lines. As usual in Korea, those appearances are well advertised at the spot, so pay attention and you might be able to try the same food as your favorite Korean stars.

 

Wolmi Theme Park

Photo: by Margarita Kichukova

 

Location: Map

Directions: 40-min walk from Incheon Station (Suin Line, Line 1)/ Bus 45, 10, 2, or 23 

Operating Hours: 10:00 - 21:00 (weekdays); 10:00 - 23:00 (weekends)

 

As a seaside city, the territory of Incheon also includes several islands, one of which is Wolmido. Directly connected to the mainland in the present day, it remains the location with the most spectacular view of the sea which unravels from the Cultural Street, the main street on the island. This is also a favorite dating place for young couples, as it combines romantic sights with an abundance of seafood restaurants, shops, and playgrounds, the culmination of which is the Wolmi Theme Park. The park is small compared to similar complexes in Seoul. Due to its small size, two-hour-long lines, otherwise an inseparable part of the Asian amusement park experience, are difficult to be seen here, so visitors can actually enjoy the rides. Another difference with the more popular amusement parks in Korea is that there is no entrance fee and each attraction is paid for separately, which makes Wolmi Theme Park significantly more affordable. 

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